Say it with pictures

Is there anything more naff than emojis? I’d always thought they were about the lowest form of communication known to man. But…

I was wrong. Perhaps it’s my recent trip to Japan – but saying it in pictures sometimes says it better than words.

This was my week:

πŸ“₯πŸ“πŸ“―πŸ“¨πŸ“€πŸšœπŸ’©πŸ“πŸ’£πŸ‘΄πŸ‘΅πŸ’€πŸ‘ƒπŸƒβŒšοΈπŸ πŸŒ΅πŸŒ›πŸ”™πŸ”œβ‰οΈ

Probably only one other person in the world truly knows what this means. But the laughter we shared on opposite ends of mobile phones puts emojis on a par with poetry.

As Aristotle almost said, perhaps sometimes the job of the poet is to say something transcendent and universal about the human condition – in no more or less emojis than are needed…

πŸ”š

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3 Responses to Say it with pictures

  1. Patricia says:

    Oh dear. I had to look up naff and emojis. Naff is in the dictionary but not emojis. What is it?

    • John Worne says:

      Here you go:

      Emoji (η΅΅ζ–‡ε­—, or γˆγ‚‚γ˜?); Japanese pronunciation: [emodΚ‘i] is the Japanese term for the ideograms or smileys used mostly in Japanese electronic messages and webpages. Originally meaning pictograph, the word emoji literally means “picture” (e) + “letter” (moji). The characters are used much like emoticons elsewhere, but a wider range is provided, and the icons are standardized and built into handsets.

      Some emoji are very specific to Japanese culture, such as a bowing (apologizing) businessman, a face wearing a face mask, a white flower used to denote “brilliant homework” or a group of emoji representing popular foods: ramen noodles, dango, onigiri, Japanese curry, and sushi.

      Although originally only available in Japan, some emoji character sets have been incorporated into Unicode, allowing them to be used elsewhere as well. As a result, some phones such as Windows Phone 7 line and the iPhone allow access to the symbols without requiring a Japanese carrier.

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